Outrun Change

We need to learn quickly to keep up with the massive change around us so we don't get run over. We need to outrun change.

Airplane photos: B-29 Superfortress on display at March Field Air Museum.

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

March Field Air Museum has a B-29A Superfortress on static display.  For your viewing pleasure, join me for a walking tour around the plane:

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

Placard reads:

Boeing B-29A

Superfortress

Designed to replace the older B-17, the B-29 Incorporated such new features as pressurized crew compartments and remotely sited gun turrets. The B-29 was the largest operational bomber of World War II. Used only against the Japanese, it relied on the speed and heavy defensive armament to render it less vulnerable to enemy fighters.

The most famous mission was in 1945 when Col. Paul Tibbetts’ B-29 dropped the first atomic bomb on Hiroshima.

The B-29 was used extensively in the Korean war (1950-1953). However the aircraft was not capable of defending itself against the jet fighters of the period and it was phased out.

44-61669 is on loan from the US Air Force Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

View of B-29 from under the tail of an F-4. Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Inside the bomb loading display. Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

Placard reads:

Loading “Little Boy”

The Atomic Bomb that destroyed Hiroshima

Overshadowed by the staggering complexities of the Manhattan Project and the creation of the world’s first nuclear weapon, thousands of simple tasks, each essential to the success of the atomic bomb, also required considerable resourcefulness and ingenuity.

Designed for conventional weapons, the B-29 super fortress stood too low to the ground to load the newly developed atomic bombs. In mid-1945, practical engineering and innovative applied mechanics led to the construction of a bomb-loading pit equipped with a hydraulic lift on the island of Tinian.

Carefully taxiing the massive bomber into place over the pit permitted the weapon to be raised into position and loaded into the forward bomb bay.

 

View of “Little Man” nuclear bomb casing. Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

View of “Little Man” bomb casing. Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Open bomb bay doors. Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Interior of forward bomb bay. Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

F-14 and a pair of F-4s in front of B-29. Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

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