In 3 years, oil production in Oklahoma, New Mexico, Wyoming, Colorado and Utah is up 56% of North Dakota’s increase – Can we call that a half-Bakken?

Seems that oil production of a new find or the increase in a field is often compared to what’s going on in the Bakken. Haven’t seen others use Bakken as a unit of measure, but I’m having a kick doing so.

Story I’ve not been following is that horizontal drilling and fracking has increased production quite a bit in states other than North Dakota and Texas.

RigZone points out in Five US Sates Help Boost US Oil Production that over the three years of February 2010 through February 2013, oil production in Oklahoma, New Mexico, Wyoming, Colorado and Utah has increased by 290,000 bopd.

How does that compare to Bakken? Glad you asked.

Production in North Dakota went from 277,640 bopd to 779,144 bopd in that same time. That’s a 517,768 barrel increase.

The five-state increase is 56% of the North Dakota increase.

Can we call that half of one Bakken production?

For a delightfully shocking visual of the increase, check out the graph at Carpe Diem – Shale oil boom spreads to Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Oklahoma.

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