Outrun Change

We need to learn quickly to keep up with the massive change around us so we don't get run over. We need to outrun change.

More on the capabilities of firefighting aircraft

Found a great resource from CAL FIRE, Firefighting Aircraft Recognition Guide, which provides a photo and background of the fixed wing and rotary wing aircraft in the Cal Fire inventory.

Some of the fun highlights, along with a few more photos:

 aircraft  capacity  crew  inventory
 DC-10       12,000             3             1
 747       24,000             3
 P-3 Orion         3,000             3             8
 P-2 Neptune         2,700             3             8
 DC-6         2,800             3
 DC-7         3,000             3
 CL-215         1,300             3
 S-2T         1,200             1
 C-130         3,000             3
 helicopters
 S-64 Skycrane         2,650             2
 S-70 Firehawk         1,000             3
 Bell 212           360             2
 Bell 412           360             2
 UH-1H Super Huey  360+324           11

 

C-130 – “dropping retardant” by seanmichaelragan is licensed under CC BY 2.0

A few tidbits from the Guide:

  • The DC-10 has a load capacity equal to 12 drops from a S-2T.
  • Both the DC-10 and the 747 can make ‘segmented’ drops, in other words they can drop just a portion of the load and thus make multiple passes.
  • Yes, the P-3 and P-2 were used as long distance maritime patrol, hunting for Soviet submarines.
  • Oh, the DC-6 and DC-7? Yes those were the planes on the cutting edge of technology in the 1940s and 1950s.
  • The S-2T is a twin-engine turboprop. The C-130 is a military version with four turboprops.
  • The S-70 is civilian version of a Blackhawk.
  • The Bell 212 and 412 are civilian versions of the Twin Huey. The 412 has four blades.

 

P-3 – “Lockheed P-3 Orion” by aresauburn is licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0

Not sure if the Cal Fire book is copyrighted, so I won’t be posting any photos from the guide. All photos above are from Flickr and are appropriately credited to the photographer.

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