Outrun Change

We need to learn quickly to keep up with the massive change around us so we don't get run over. We need to outrun change.

Airplane Photos: B-17G on display at March Field Air Museum.

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

B-17G Starduster, #44-6393, is on static display at the March Field Air Museum. For your viewing pleasure here are photos of the magnificent plane as it appeared in June 2020.

This is my tiny tribute to all those who fought to end actual fascism 80 years ago, especially the hundreds of thousands who never came home.

For a better view, click on any picture.

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

The placard reads:

Boeing B-17G

Flying Fortress

Bomber (WWII)

Height 19’1” – Length 74’9” – wingspan 103’9” – Max weight – 65,000 lbs – Payload 6,000 lbs – Armament 12-13 .50 cal machine guns – Crew 10 – Max speed 300 mph – Engines four Wright R-1820-97 @ 1200 HP each

The B-17 was one of the greatest bombers flown during WWII. Flying daring daylight raids into Germany, the B-17s achieved extreme accuracy. B-17s were known to absorb heavy damage and remain aloft. They have flown missing huge sections of their fuselage, or fly on three, two and even one engine. Built by Douglas 6393 was delivered in July 1944 to the 15th AF, 97th BG in Italy. In late 1944 it became the staff aircraft for Gen. Ira Eaker while he was commander of the M.A.A.F.  After the war it was assigned to various units and declared surplus in 1955. In 1956 it was transferred to the Bolivian Air Force where it was used as a cargo plane. It was completely stripped inside and modified to be flown from the right seat. After 25 years, 6393 was the last flying B-17 in Bolivia and was returned to the US in Jan 1981. 6393 flew to March AFB with over 13,000 flight hours. In 1997 her restoration began with donations from the 97th BG.

44-6393 served the USAAF from 1944-1955

This aircraft is on loan from the US Air Force Museum.

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Close up of tail gunner position. Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Back in March 2016, Starduster had a different coat of paint. It also had bombardier equipment visible in the nose section. Photos from a walk around of the aircraft four years ago:

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

Bombardier equipment is visible in nose. Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

Close up of ball turret. Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

 

One last photo, in current presentation:

Photo by James Ulvog at March Field Air Museum.

Single Post Navigation

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: